Max Roach, R.I.P.

Page 1 sur 2 1, 2  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Steven le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 16:56

Pas plus de détails pour le moment mais Max Roach vient de nous quitter...

[img]http://www.islandoflosttoys.com/images/heroes/max_roach3.jpg[/img] [img]http://www.musicaids.org/_borders/MaxRoach039_37.jpg[/img]

Sadly,

Steven

Steven
Le Graoully
Le Graoully

Nombre de messages : 1566
Age : 30
Localisation : Paris, France
Date d'inscription : 04/01/2006

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Duppy le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 17:50

Bon, ben maintenant je peux le dire : je ne le verrai donc jamais en live !

Un musicien trés important pour moi.

Duppy
JazzMan
JazzMan

Nombre de messages : 1769
Age : 54
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://randomizm.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Steven le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 17:56

[img]http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/misc/logoprinter.gif[/img]
[quote]August 16, 2007
[size=18][b][url=http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/16/arts/music/16cnd-roach.html?_r=1&hp=&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1187284033-tSkiIyJBDm01oykeYs86hQ&pagewanted=print]Max Roach, a Founder of Modern Jazz, Dies at 83[/url][/b][/size]
By PETER KEEPNEWS

Max Roach, a founder of modern jazz who rewrote the rules of drumming in the 1940’s and spent the rest of his career breaking musical barriers and defying listeners’ expectations, died early today at his home in New York. He was 83.

His death was announced today by a spokesman for Blue Note records, on which he frequently appeared. No cause was given. Mr. Roach had been known to be ill for several years.

As a young man, Mr. Roach, a percussion virtuoso capable of playing at the most brutal tempos with subtlety as well as power, was among a small circle of adventurous musicians who brought about wholesale changes in jazz. He remained adventurous to the end.

Over the years he challenged both his audiences and himself by working not just with standard jazz instrumentation, and not just in traditional jazz venues, but in a wide variety of contexts, some of them well beyond the confines of jazz as that word is generally understood.

He led a “double quartet” consisting of his working group of trumpet, saxophone, bass and drums plus a string quartet. He led an ensemble consisting entirely of percussionists. He dueted with uncompromising avant-gardists like the pianist Cecil Taylor and the saxophonist Anthony Braxton. He performed unaccompanied. He wrote music for plays by Sam Shepard and dance pieces by Alvin Ailey. He collaborated with video artists, gospel choirs and hip-hop performers.

Mr. Roach explained his philosophy to The New York Times in 1990: “You can’t write the same book twice. Though I’ve been in historic musical situations, I can’t go back and do that again. And though I run into artistic crises, they keep my life interesting.”

He found himself in historic situations from the beginning of his career. He was still in his teens when he played drums with the alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, a pioneer of modern jazz, at a Harlem after-hours club in 1942. Within a few years, Mr. Roach was himself recognized as a pioneer in the development of the sophisticated new form of jazz that came to be known as bebop.

He was not the first drummer to play bebop — Kenny Clarke, 10 years his senior, is generally credited with that distinction — but he quickly established himself as both the most imaginative percussionist in modern jazz and the most influential.

In Mr. Roach’s hands, the drum kit became much more than a means of keeping time. He saw himself as a full-fledged member of the front line, not simply as a supporting player.

Layering rhythms on top of rhythms, he paid as much attention to a song’s melody as to its beat. He developed, as the jazz critic Burt Korall put it, “a highly responsive, contrapuntal style,” engaging his fellow musicians in an open-ended conversation while maintaining a rock-solid pulse. His approach “initially mystified and thoroughly challenged other drummers,” Mr. Korall wrote, but quickly earned the respect of his peers and established a new standard for the instrument.

Mr. Roach was an innovator in other ways. In the late 1950s, he led a group that was among the first in jazz to regularly perform pieces in waltz time and other unusual meters in addition to the conventional 4/4. In the early 1960s, he was among the first to use jazz to address racial and political issues, with works like the album-length “We Insist! Freedom Now Suite.”

In 1972, he became one of the first jazz musicians to teach full time at the college level when he was hired as a professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. And in 1988, he became the first jazz musician to receive a so-called genius grant from the MacArthur Foundation.

Maxwell Roach was born on Jan. 10, 1924, in the small town of New Land, N.C., and grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn. He began studying piano at a neighborhood Baptist church when he was 8 and took up the drums a few years later.

Even before he graduated from Boys High School in 1942, savvy New York jazz musicians knew his name. As a teenager he worked briefly with Duke Ellington’s orchestra at the Paramount Theater and with Charlie Parker at Monroe’s Uptown House in Harlem, where he took part in jam sessions that helped lay the groundwork for bebop.

By the middle 1940’s, he had become a ubiquitous presence on the New York jazz scene, working in the 52nd Street nightclubs with Parker, the trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and other leading modernists. Within a few years he had become equally ubiquitous on record, participating in such seminal recordings as Miles Davis’s “Birth of the Cool” sessions in 1949 and 1950.

He also found time to study composition at the Manhattan School of Music. He had planned to major in percussion, he later recalled in an interview, but changed his mind after a teacher told him his technique was incorrect. “The way he wanted me to play would have been fine if I’d been after a career in a symphony orchestra,” he said, “but it wouldn’t have worked on 52nd Street.”

Mr. Roach made the transition from sideman to leader in 1954, when he and the young trumpet virtuoso Clifford Brown formed a quintet. That group, which specialized in a muscular and stripped-down version of bebop that came to be called hard bop, took the jazz world by storm. But it was short-lived.

In June 1956, at the height of the Brown-Roach quintet’s success, Brown was killed in an automobile accident, along with Richie Powell, the group’s pianist, and Powell’s wife. The sudden loss of his friend and co-leader, Mr. Roach later recalled, plunged him into depression and heavy drinking from which it took him years to emerge.

Nonetheless, he kept working. He honored his existing nightclub bookings with the two surviving members of his group, the saxophonist Sonny Rollins and the bassist George Morrow, before briefly taking time off and putting together a new quartet. By the end of the 50’s, seemingly recovered from his depression, he was recording prolifically, mostly as a leader but occasionally as a sideman with Mr. Rollins and others.

The personnel of Mr. Roach’s working group changed frequently over the next decade, but the level of artistry and innovation remained high. His sidemen included such important musicians as the saxophonists Eric Dolphy, Stanley Turrentine and George Coleman and the trumpet players Donald Byrd, Kenny Dorham and Booker Little. Few of his groups had a pianist, making for a distinctively open ensemble sound in which Mr. Roach’s drums were prominent.

Always among the most politically active of jazz musicians, Mr. Roach had helped the bassist Charles Mingus establish one of the first musician-run record companies, Debut, in 1952. Eight years later, the two organized a so-called rebel festival in Newport, R.I., to protest the Newport Jazz Festival’s treatment of performers. That same year, Mr. Roach collaborated with the lyricist Oscar Brown Jr. on “We Insist! Freedom Now Suite,” which played variations on the theme of black people’s struggle for equality in the United States and Africa.

The album, which featured vocals by Abbey Lincoln (Mr. Roach’s frequent collaborator and, from 1962 to 1970, his wife), received mixed reviews: many critics praised its ambition, but some attacked it as overly polemical. Mr. Roach was undeterred.

“I will never again play anything that does not have social significance,” he told Down Beat magazine after the album’s release. “We American jazz musicians of African descent have proved beyond all doubt that we’re master musicians of our instruments. Now what we have to do is employ our skill to tell the dramatic story of our people and what we’ve been through.”

“We Insist!” was not a commercial success, but it emboldened Mr. Roach to broaden his scope as a composer. Soon he was collaborating with choreographers, filmmakers and Off Broadway playwrights on projects, including a stage version of “We Insist!”

As his range of activities expanded, his career as a bandleader became less of a priority. At the same time, the market for his uncompromising brand of small-group jazz began to diminish. By the time he joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts in 1972, teaching had come to seem an increasingly attractive alternative to the demands of the musician’s life.

Joining the academy did not mean turning his back entirely on performing. In the early ‘70s, Mr. Roach joined with seven fellow drummers to form M’Boom, an ensemble that achieved tonal and coloristic variety through the use of xylophones, chimes, steel drums and other percussion instruments. Later in the decade he formed a new quartet, two of whose members — the saxophonist Odean Pope and the trumpeter Cecil Bridgewater — would perform and record with him off and on for more than two decades.

He also participated in a number of unusual experiments. He appeared in concert in 1983 with a rapper, two disc jockeys and a team of break dancers. A year later, he composed music for an Off Broadway production of three Sam Shepard plays, for which he won an Obie Award. In 1985, he took part in a multimedia collaboration with the video artist Kit Fitzgerald and the stage director George Ferencz.

Perhaps his most ambitious experiment in those years was the Max Roach Double Quartet, a combination of his quartet and the Uptown String Quartet. Jazz musicians had performed with string accompaniment before, but rarely if ever in a setting like this, where the string players were an equal part of the ensemble and were given the opportunity to improvise. Reviewing a Double Quartet album in The Times in 1985, Robert Palmer wrote, “For the first time in the history of jazz recording, strings swing as persuasively as any saxophonist or drummer.”

This endeavor had personal as well as musical significance for Mr. Roach: the Uptown String Quartet’s founder and viola player was his daughter Maxine. She survives him, as do two other daughters, Ayo and Dara, and two sons, Raoul and Darryl.

By the early ‘90s, Mr. Roach had reduced his teaching load and was again based in New York year-round, traveling to Amherst only for two residencies and a summer program each year. He was still touring with his quartet as recently as 2000, and he also remained active as a composer. In 2002 he wrote and performed the music for “How to Draw a Bunny,” a documentary about the artist Ray Johnson.[/quote]

Steven
Le Graoully
Le Graoully

Nombre de messages : 1566
Age : 30
Localisation : Paris, France
Date d'inscription : 04/01/2006

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Kalidas le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 18:36

C'est un désastre, je m'y attendais, mais c'est une catastrophe, ça me ravage....j'ai pu le voir plusieurs fois, merveilleux et c'est un de ceux que je retrouve toujours avec vénération sur son immense discographie

beaucoup d'émotion

Kalidas
Jazzayatollah
Jazzayatollah

Nombre de messages : 3824
Age : 58
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 28/11/2005

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 18:51

quelle tristesse. J'ai eu le plaisir de voir plusieurs fois Mr. max roach dans diverses formations ( son quintet, M'boom, en sideman ) . ce sont des souvenirs exceptionnels. je crains qu'il ne reste plus que sonny rollins de la grande époque.

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Invité le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 19:55

Putaing

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  PhillyJoe le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 20:12

Yaïe ! L'en-tête (Max Roach, R.I.P.) m'a coupé le souffle, en ouvrant le forum à l'instant...
Encore la perte d'un musicien irremplaçable... Verrons-nous un jour les véritables fils spirituels des Klook, Max, Bu, Elvin, Philly Joe ? Bien sûr que non, mais leur drive coule dans les veines de tous ceux qui les ont suivis.
PM pour Roy Haynes : hey, man ! Continue à prendre tes vitamines ! A présent que Max est parti, tu es le Dernier des Mohicans...

Total respect, et humilité...

PhillyJoe
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 440
Age : 56
Localisation : Suisse romande
Date d'inscription : 12/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Duppy le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 20:17

Gaston, tu as vu M'Boom ? et son quintet ? avec Odeon Pope et Cecil Bridgewater ? Et Kalidas aussi j'imagine...

Duppy
JazzMan
JazzMan

Nombre de messages : 1769
Age : 54
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://randomizm.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Gromit le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 20:26

Grande tristesse.

Gromit
Modérateur
Modérateur

Nombre de messages : 1949
Age : 70
Localisation : Banlieue Sud
Date d'inscription : 05/01/2006

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.flickr.com/photos/gromit2011/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 20:35

pas avec odeon pope mais avec bill harper

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 20:37

un souvenir me revient : un concert pour la libération de nelson mandela avec max aux tambours, bernard lubat et le chanteur malien salif keita- good groove!

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Duppy le Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 22:44

83 ans, un bel âge pour mourir non ?

je copie-colle mes impressions suite au visionnage d'un documentaire sur Max Roach vu il y a 3 mois.

[quote]Vu en dvd ce week-end un documentaire sur Max Roach passé sur Arte (merci Etienne !!!).

Trop court, mais vraiment bien foutu. Le doc retrace le chemin de ce grand batteur :

- ses débuts, avec notamment un remplacement de Sony Greer dans le Big Band de Duke Ellington
- ses principales influences : Joe Jones, Sidney Catlett et Kenny Clarke.
- la naissance du bop avec Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell
- son premier quintet avec Clifford Brown et Sonny Rollins, avec un passage assez émouvant sur la mort accidentelle de Clifford Brown et Richie Powell
- sa période militante, [i]Freedom Now[/i], Coleman Hawkins
- ses diverses expériences : ses solos, M'Boom (collectif de percussionnistes), les duos avec Antony Braxton, Abdullah Ibrahim & Cecil Taylor, les cordes et sa fille Maxine, une performance avec un MC (inconnu pour moi) et les New York Breakers...

Quelques petites anecdotes savoureuses (un danseur de 16 ans qui viens lui dire à la fin du set : "Comment tu t'appelles déjà ? Tu assures mec !"), pas mal de pudeur (ses problèmes avec l'alcool et la drogue), et toujours beaucoup de classe.

Voici quelques extraits trouvés sur Youtube :

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VhQtgSZbsY][color=blue]M'Boom, cordes et Hip Hop[/color][/url]

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBRbrKSHWAo&mode=related&search=][color=blue]Animation et solo sur le discours de Martin Luther King[/color][/url]

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8syiOwwVyY][color=blue]Hi-Hat (hommage à Joe Jones)[/color][/url]

Ceux là ne sont pas dans le documentaire, mais valent le coup d'oeil aussi :

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHSBNv-IFrA&mode=related&search=][color=blue]Drum Waltz[/color][/url]

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS-xiX64HGQ&mode=related&search=][color=blue]Max Roach At His Best[/color][/url]

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wnW2KLWE-g&mode=related&search=][color=blue]The Third Eye[/color][/url]

Les batteurs sont souvent mes meilleurs souvenirs de concerts de jazz : Art Blakey, Roy Haynes, Ed Blackwell, Beaver Harris, Daniel Humair... Max Roach, hélas, je n'ai jamais eu l'occasion de le voir...[/quote]

(je l'avais pas déjà posté ici ?)

Duppy
JazzMan
JazzMan

Nombre de messages : 1769
Age : 54
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://randomizm.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  mosquito69 le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 7:06

FIP lui rend hommage aujourd'hui...
Voici les vidéos de drummerworld...
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/drummers/Max_Roach.html
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/maxroachwaltz.html
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/MaxRoachhihat.html
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/MaxRoachbrush.html
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/MaxRoachthirdeye.html
...
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/MaxRoachsolo.html
...
Tient je vais me réécouter [b]MONEY JUNGLE [/b]...
Si vous avez 1 CD à me conseiller...
Merci..

mosquito69
Fipomaniaque
Fipomaniaque

Nombre de messages : 381
Date d'inscription : 09/12/2005

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Duppy le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 7:21

1 cd... Pfff... Impossible. Une petite liste plutôt...

Tiens, comme ça, je pense de suite à [b]Out Front - Booker Little with Eric Dolphy et Max Roach[/b], et ses roulements sur [i]Moods In Free Time[/i].

Kalidas en parle trés bien dans le topic "Disques".

Duppy
JazzMan
JazzMan

Nombre de messages : 1769
Age : 54
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://randomizm.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Invité le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 15:12

[center]comme de sourcesure.net, les artistes se vendent mieux une fois défunts, j'ai commandé ceçi ce matin:


[img]http://www.dustygroove.com/images/products/r/roach_max~~_jazzinpar_101b.jpg[/img]


[/center]

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  PhillyJoe le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 15:17

Tiens, mosquito, essaie ça : "Drums Unmlimited" un monument de la maîtrise "batteristique" (c'est pas comme ça qu'on dit ?)

[url]http://dailyjazz.blogspot.com/2005/10/max-roach-drums-unlimited.html[/url]

PhillyJoe
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 440
Age : 56
Localisation : Suisse romande
Date d'inscription : 12/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 19:59

la nécro du monde ( le journal bien sur )

[url]http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-3382,36-945247@51-945135,0.html[/url]

sous le style toujours merveilleusement ampoulé de F.marmande...

il cite le concert pour la libération de nelson mandela en 85. J'y étais mais, même en me triturant les méninges, je n'ai aucun souvenir de manu dibango.

de même le disque candid "newport rebels" cité ne fait pas du tout apparaître max jouant avec mingus, dolphy et eldridge. sur ces plages le batteur est joe jones. bah ça fait rien, un peu d'approximation ne peut jamais nuire.

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Duppy le Ven 17 Aoû 2007 - 21:06

Je connaissais pas cette histoire sur la session de [i]Money Jungle[/i]. Mais pas le premier ni le dernier musicien persécuté par Mingus :).

Sinon, petit papier pas trop mal : le bop, le quintet avec Clifford Brown, le coté politique ([i]We Insist![/i]), Abbey Lincoln, ses disques avec la nouvelle génération des années 60 (Booker Little et Eric Dolphy), son quintet, M'Boom, ses duos.

Quasiment parfait si Marmande n'avait occulté son double quartet avec sa fille Maxine.

Duppy
JazzMan
JazzMan

Nombre de messages : 1769
Age : 54
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 12/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://randomizm.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  zetlejazz le Sam 18 Aoû 2007 - 19:45

Le grand Max nous a quitté, quelle perte !

Pour l'occasion je lui réserve très prochainement une journée spéciale sur les pages du blog.

Par contre, sur cette fameuse video "Hot House" de Charlie et Dizzy, j'ai toujours pensé que c'était lui aux drums, finalement, aucune mention ne confirme ma pensée.

http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=91dolWWdetI

Quelqu'un pourrait-il me dire ce qu'il en pense ?


zetlejazz
Au delà de Jazzitude
Au delà de Jazzitude

Nombre de messages : 2199
Age : 44
Localisation : Région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 16/08/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://zetlejazz.canalblog.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Sam 18 Aoû 2007 - 20:48

je pense qu'il s'agit de charlie smith, assez obscur drummer qui jouait avec dick hyman

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  gaston le Sam 18 Aoû 2007 - 23:19

une précision car ça me turlupinait, relative à charlie smith ( car c'est bien lui dans la bande vidéo) il n'est en fait pas si obscur que ça puisqu'il a accompagné ella fitzgerald errol garner george shearing oscar peterson etc et a même brièvement joué chez duke ellington

gaston
Contaminé
Contaminé

Nombre de messages : 498
Age : 70
Localisation : tours
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://gaspacho-in-the-night.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Kalidas le Dim 19 Aoû 2007 - 0:09

oui c'est bien charlie smith aux drums (ET Dick Hyman au piano) mais à la basse c'est qui ? [b]Sandy Block ou Jack Lesberg [/b]?

bonne nuit je suis cuit...

Kalidas
Jazzayatollah
Jazzayatollah

Nombre de messages : 3824
Age : 58
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 28/11/2005

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  zetlejazz le Dim 19 Aoû 2007 - 11:49

Salut et merci beaucoup pour votre participation !

Je ne sais pas pourquoi mais la bouille de Charlie Smith me faisait bien penser à Max ! D’autant que pour la période, Max aurait tout à fait pu être dans le coup !

Sinon, en ce dimanche, je viens de rendre hommage au grand Max Roach à travers une journée spéciale sur le blog, avec bio, extraits audio et vidéo, photos…

Tous les honneurs sont pour lui aujourd’hui : http://zetlejazz.canalblog.com/

Bonne journée

Z

zetlejazz
Au delà de Jazzitude
Au delà de Jazzitude

Nombre de messages : 2199
Age : 44
Localisation : Région parisienne
Date d'inscription : 16/08/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://zetlejazz.canalblog.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  captainbop le Dim 19 Aoû 2007 - 16:18

Bonjour,
Et un de plus !
Et un de moins !
Des fois, ça m'fout la trouille de regarder mes étagères en me disant "Il y a de plus en plus de morts!"...
Il reste leur zique !
Heureusement.
Cordialement.


Dernière édition par le Dim 19 Aoû 2007 - 17:59, édité 1 fois

captainbop
Bouquiniste de bon aloi
Bouquiniste de bon aloi

Nombre de messages : 697
Age : 71
Localisation : Au soleil
Date d'inscription : 18/02/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Steven le Dim 19 Aoû 2007 - 17:34

Loupien y est allé de son papier dans Libé : [url]http://www.liberation.fr/culture/272871.FR.php[/url]

[quote:e9d8="Libération du samedi 18 août 2007"]
[img]http://www.liberation.fr/_looks/liberation/images/main_logo_329x101.gif[/img]
[size=18][b]Il est free, Max[/b][/size]
par Serge LOUPIEN.

[b][i]Décédé jeudi à 83 ans, Max Roach, le plus musicien des batteurs, fut de toutes les révolutions du jazz et joua avec les plus grands.[/i][/b]

Une rumeur tenace voudrait que les Beatles lui aient dédié leur Maxwell’s Silver Hammer. Affirmation nullement confirmée par le duo Lennon-McCartney, mais plausible, dans la mesure où l’enclumeur maison, Ringo Starr, alors sous influence Charlie Watts (responsable de la rencontre Rollins-Stones), avoua un réel penchant ponctuel pour les «virtuoses be-bop». Qualificatif longtemps accolé au nom de Maxwell Lemuel Roach, justement. Même si celui-ci, révélé au public jazzy grâce au rôle qu’il tint derrière Charlie Parker et Dizzy Gillespie, fut bien plus que le maître d’un seul style. Max Roach restera en effet comme l’un des plus grands batteurs de l’histoire du jazz. Comme l’un de ses plus prestigieux solistes aussi, pour avoir permis à son instrument de conquérir l’indépendance, inventant au passage le «drumming polyrythmique», futur ciment de toute rythmique free.

[b]Bugle.[/b] Né à Newland, Caroline du Nord, le 10 janvier 1924, arrivé à New York pour son quatrième anniversaire, Max Roach n’était pourtant pas prédestiné à révolutionner la batterie. Puisque, à 8 ans déjà, il maîtrisait le bugle, pistonnant fièrement dans les rues de Brooklyn au sein d’une fanfare locale. Et ce n’est que sur l’insistance de sa mère, chanteuse de gospel, qu’il se résoudra à entrer en percussions, se rodant dans des orchestres de spirituals. Friand des usines à swing, que ses parents lui font découvrir à l’Apollo de Harlem, comme des concerts symphoniques dominicaux donnés près de son domicile, il décide de s’inscrire au département percussions de la Manhattan School of Music. Là, il connaîtra sa première désillusion en découvrant la compartim entation du monde de la musique. «La façon dont on m’obligeait à jouer, dira-t-il, aurait été parfaite si j’avais voulu devenir musicien symphonique. Elle était aberrante pour travailler dans la 52e Rue.» Et comme on lui demande de choisir, Max Roach va donc ranger ses partitions classiques et s’immerger dans l’univers du jazz.

[b]Novateur.[/b] A 16 ans, il effectue une pige dans le big band ­de Duke Ellington pour pallier l’absence de Sonny Greer. Quelques semaines plus tard, il joue de nouveau les pompiers de service, pour le compte ­cette fois de Count Basie. Ses modèles sont alors Chick Webb et Big Sid Catlett : deux monstres de la percussion, de facture plutôt classique. Le premier, disparu prématurément en 1938, a révélé Ella Fitzgerald ; le second a joué avec Louis Armstrong. C’est pourtant via le rhythm’n’blues que Max Roach va obtenir sa carte professionnelle, en intégrant la formation du créateur de ­Caldonia : Louis Jordan. Pas pour longtemps.

Fasciné par le jeu de Kenny Clarke, législateur de la batterie be-bop, de dix ans son aîné, Max Roach adhère d’emblée à ce mouvement novateur qui commence à révolutionner le jazz et s’impose vite comme le partenaire idéal de ses deux principaux théoriciens: Dizzy Gillespie et Charlie Parker. Avec ceux-ci, il va enregistrer quelques classiques du genre, dont Billie’s Bounce et Now’s The Time, collaborer ensuite avec Miles Davis (Birth of The Cool), jouer avec Thelonious Monk, puis fonder, en 1952, avec Charles Mingus, le label phonographique Debut, sur lequel sera commercialisé Jazz at Massey Hall, «le plus grand concert de tous les temps» , enregistré par un combo réunissant Gillespie, Parker, Bud Powell, Mingus et Roach. Face aux réactions enthousiastes suscitées par son jeu, d’une lisibilité exceptionnelle, ce dernier commentera lapidairement : «J’ai décidé que tous les instruments étaient égaux sur scène. La batterie y compris.»

En 1954, Max Roach devient donc leader. Il codirige, avec le trompettiste Clifford Brown, un quintette hard-bop complété par le ténor Harold Land (remplacé ensuite par Sonny Rollins), le pianiste Richie Powell (frère de Bud) et le bassiste George Morrow. Deux ans plus tard, alors que le groupe est à son zénith, Brown et Powell périssent dans un accident automobile. Très proche du trompettiste, Max Roach sombre alors dans l’alcool et la dépression. Le soutien de ses pairs, Rollins notamment (avec lequel il a gravé Saxophone Colosseus et The Freedom Suite), et surtout sa conscience politique vont l’aider à se sortir de ce mauvais pas. «Je ne jouerai plus jamais de musique dépourvue de résonance sociale», déclare-t-il ainsi après avoir enregistré, en 1960, avec Oscar Brown Jr., Coleman Hawkins, Booker Little et son épouse Abbey Lincoln, alias Anna-Maria Wooldridge : We Insist ! Freedom Now Suite. L’heure, il est vrai, est à la contestation et à la lutte pour les droits civiques. «Notre but à nous, musiciens afro-américains, est de raconter la dramatique histoire de notre peuple», poursuit Max Roach, faisant front aux multiples critiques.
Ce but, il ne le perdra jamais de vue. Montant, avec Mingus toujours et Eric Dolphy, le mouvement Newport Rebels en réaction au festival de Newport, prolongeant Freedom Now Suite (sous l’intitulé It’s Time), participant en 1962 aux sessions de Money Jungle (trio avec Charles Mingus et Duke ­Ellington), gravant un essentiel Drums Unlimited (1966), fondant en 1973 l’ensemble de percussions M’Boom . Le free jazz, qui lui doit tant, ne le laisse pas non plus indifférent.

Il enregistre avec Archie Shepp (en 1976), Anthony Braxton (en 1978), Cecil Taylor (en 1979). «Car, affirme-t-il, on ne peut pas écrire deux fois le même livre. Je ne veux pas retourner en arrière mais continuer de chercher. Même si cela doit déboucher sur des crises artistiques.»
Expériences. Jusqu’au bout, Max Roach multipliera les ­expériences les plus diverses. Dans le domaine du jazz (avec rappeurs, DJ’s, orchestre à cordes), celui de la musique de scène (pour des pièces de Sam Shepard en particulier) ou de ballet (Alvin Ailey). Il n’oublie pas pour autant ses activités de militant, jouant pour la libération de Nelson Mandela (avec Salif Keita et Bernard Lubat), s’associant à une lecture parisienne de la romancière Toni Morrison (1994).

Depuis quelques années pourtant, sa santé allait déclinant, car on savait Max Roach atteint d’un cancer. Jeudi, le plus musicien des batteurs s’est donc éteint paisiblement pendant son sommeil. Pour le plus grand chagrin de son ami Sonny Rollins qui, désormais, ne pourra plus réfuter le qualificatif «dernier des géants» en prétextant : «Max Roach lui aussi est bien vivant.» [/quote]

Steven
Le Graoully
Le Graoully

Nombre de messages : 1566
Age : 30
Localisation : Paris, France
Date d'inscription : 04/01/2006

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Max Roach, R.I.P.

Message  Contenu sponsorisé Aujourd'hui à 10:09


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 1 sur 2 1, 2  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum